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20121101
20121130
STATION
LINKTV 19
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
, farad did that. i guess he read that and he told us that in mecca, the streets were paved with gold. he said, "there are mansions there, built for you already, and they're waiting for you." and when i went there, i saw rocks and sand. you know, that was before aramco pulled out, you know, and turned over everything to the saudis, the kingdom of saudi arabia. so i saw rocks and sand- i didn't see any streets paved with gold; there was no golden fountains in the hotels or anything. now there are, but- >> yeah, i'll say. fire away, janet. >> is that part of what helped change your mind and increase your understanding was the fact that you saw rocks and sand instead of the- >> no. my father was disappointed. i expected- by that time, i was old enough and really informed of what the world looked like enough to not to be disappointed. my father was disappointed. before he went to saudi arabia- and he made umrah, the lesser pilgrimage. he made umrah, where you go by yourself, not with all the muslims- the annual pilgrimage. and he made the lesser pilgrimage to mecca, he went to pakistan, he we
. and many of us, like myself, that spent a long time, a career out in the street picking up garbage and sweeping streets, we started thinking, "why do we need an artist?" "what we really need is a good mechanic, or somebody that can build trucks." it was the last person we thought we needed. but as i got to know her and the department got to know her, we appreciated bringing an artist into the department. she's done an awful lot for us. it's like a ballet sort of, you know? he dumps, and then these two guys crisscross each other. this guy will start pushing it down, and you'll see the other machine works from the bottom. ukeles: my work has a lot to do with walking. just plain walking through a place has a lot of meaning for me. i look back on my work, and you can see me sort of walking through systems or cities, towns. i've already had the opportunity to create a public artwork on a landfill at danehy park in cambridge, massachusetts. the landfill was closed in 1972, healed, and then reopened 20 years later as a park. this used to be a terrible, smelly dump. now, it's reborn. i cre
, of the dead may be cook healthy [inaudible]. >> well we're very happy to have dr. glenn shive with us thank you very much for coming down here. >> pleasure. >> i'll definitely need some help as you can tell. let me - you're going to china in a couple of days. >> indeed. >> but just a little back ground your interest in china and chinese religions. >> well i studied religion in temple university in philadelphia. and then went in to chinese history and my degree is in chinese history, modern, but also always interested in chinese thought and the classics. i went to taiwan in the years before it was possible for americans to go to the main land to study, i studied classical chinese and so the great writers, philosophers and thinkers at the time and then i ended up writing my dissertation about mao tse-tung, so very i'm much in the contemporary era. so i've kind of done a lot of things in taiwan to shanghai where i taught at east china normal university and later in hong kong, where i'm going again as a full writer. >> okay that's good. how long did it take you to get through grad school? >> th
to an extremely urbanid and mobile population. in the u.s., many urban areas are characterized by diverse cultures, which create a rich ethnic mosaic. oufocus is boston, massachuse, part of a megalopolis located on the northeastern seaboa othe iteds. macaciopulio part of a megalopolis locahave taken root in older seainner-city neighborhoods. in recent decades, these neighborhoods deteriorated, with a downward spiral in infrastructure, services and opportunities. bunow stons bouncing back. with a downward spiral we'll see how relative location to the central business district, or cbd, is important to the development of these neighborhoods-- how so much can ride on their being part of federally-funded enterprise zones and how geographic information systems, or gis, can be used in addressing some difficult urban economic and social issues. boston, massachusetts. once a great port, it's now a world leader in high tech, higher education, bmedicine and finance. but like most u.s. cities, boston lost many jobs and middle-class residents to the suburbs. it's a regional problem-- part of the widening gap b
can't just go and move a brush around. i have to have a beginning. i don't want to just use models, figures. i just want to have some reason. and the beginning is adam and eve and a tree and a serpent and a garden, and that's enough, see. except that pat didn't like that kind of biblical con-- you know. and she said, "don't use adam and eve and creation. just say, 'you and me.'" and i liked that very much. i almost got that, didn't i, pat? passlof: yes. i can see just what i can do, and i could almost see the right thing to do. it wouldn't take much to get this started, huh? but, you know, i did this all in a couple of hours. the first five minutes is the best. [ laughing ] after that, you're in trouble. what am i going to do with these paintings? i have to think of something that will give me a start. i don't like the size of the figures. it's the wrong size. passlof: well, it's easy to cut them down. mm-mmm. i thought i could manage this size, and i now i see -- they are much larger than you usually do. yeah. and this, of course, is ridiculous. and that's ridiculous. absolutely r
us a little bit about how you affect the community. i mean there is stuff going on all around here i can tell. >> well it started 16 years ago when i first came. in this same room i had a meeting with the counsel about 15 whites, average age, of about 70. and as i as having the meeting to accept this call, i looked around and every window here was boarded up. what those people had done they had locked themselves in. swedes, they had locked themselves in, nothing could get in, and nothing could get out. so i knew that night, when i accept this call that something had to be done. and the very next day, we started working, because we do know what the community needs; we do know what the black church speaks for and we were able to go and they helped me and found out one thing that it was not as bad as they thought. they noticed that from time to time, i'd rub my hands and see nothing could come off, it didn't come off we are good. so what we are able to do now, we try to hold on to a little of their history, so they wouldn't be just wiped out and we brought our history in and we mixed th
's presented. but coming from a devout muslim, could you explain the five pillars of islam to us? >> yeah. these five pillars basically are- there are two aspects of- that we just call the five articles of faith, and then the practice of that faith comprised into the five pillars of islam. and the first pillar of islam, it is called shahada- it means bearing witness to the truth- and it goes like that, that i be a witness there is no god but allah, and i bear witness that mohammed is his final the last messenger. now this is a kind of confession out of credal formula, in a sense that anybody who wants to be- join the community of the muslims just has to take the shahada or make- confess that in the public, he will be considered as a muslim. now how one muslim, or a person being a muslim must live as his relation to god, then these are the rest of the other four pillars which explain. and so from that, the second would be what muslims call the salaat, or the performance of the worship prayer. and this worship prayer- five times daily, prayers are called- now they are performed in congregat
, "tell me who this person is." i actually do find that a useful way of defining the notion of hollywood. now, joan, for you, has this hollywood style shaped your work? have you been moving away from it consciously or not? i don't see that one could make films or even live your life without being affected by hollywood style. it's so much a part of what we all grew up on what we all see what we all talk about, think about and it's almost a common language amongst, certainly people in america. i guess what i'm curious about is i want to ask james why do you think that executives are uncomfortable with more personal things and they prefer things that seem to be referential to other films-- because they'll do better? because they simply fit into something they've already done, so they feel...? despite presenting themselves as risk takers most executives in hollywood are quite the contrary. they are people allergic to risk. whit, you haven't had that much experience in hollywood itself but to what extent have you used it as a model to define yourself if necessarily against or next to...? i re
the earth quake are finally being done in our church. and they have offered that to us free of charge with a very welcoming approach. and this is a version of black-korean relationship that doesn't make the headlines and i think that kind of thing is going on, but it's on the community level and the media don't find that as interesting as some of the conflicts that have occurred. >> you know the media question aside, one reason why i wanted to bring that in at this juncture of the course at the end, is that it brings out another key class theme that keeps hitting me over and over again and it's been fairly recent. that there really is no such thing as religion, there are human beings and all these different religious organizations and religious systems that we've talked about this semester and we barely scratched the surfaces as you well know. there are people who for whatever reason and however they do are letting their religion transform them. and i think we've hit on it too many times to say it's just fluff for words or optimism or polly anna attitude when people allow their religi
with us the holy land, it's okay. but not to control, not to reign, not to occupy, not to, you know, humiliate people, like what's going on in the west bank. >> and it's hard to believe that when somebody will take his land to give up and to say, "okay, let's have peace, and our land is with them," it's so difficult to believe, and if we look here, and the mountains that is our land here, and israel. they take and give to the jews, from our land. it's difficult to have peace in that situation. how could i trust them when they just all the time try constantly to humiliate and to expand, and just in that point of view, how can we trust them and have peace? >> but this is a central problem of our life here, there's no doubt, and i'll answer for myself and not as a spokesperson for the institute right now. in my opinion, the only basis for a solution in relations between palestinians and jews in the land of israel is a partition into two states, and let me explain. originally, in 1947, the united nations called upon a division, or called for a division of the land of israel into two sta
somewhere around st. louis was creamed with a major earthquake in the early 1800, yes it can happen in the u.s. >> you are right. what's the name of that fault? >> the new madrid fault, it runs through southern illinois and into missouri. and - there is the possibility >> of course there is a possibility. there is also a possibility that when the millennium comes we are all going to blow up. >> there are more possibilities that there is going to be an earthquake on the new madrid fault, due to geological fact, that's my point. >> this will show you how it can happen. i live in a slab house, concrete one floor. i was in the family room ironing and i was hanging up a shirt and the iron started going like this and i said whatever you kids are doing up there cut it out. i didn't realize - it's a first time i experienced a tremor, and it was right in park forest. so it did happen and it's happened since. >> well speaking of faults i'm at an incredible fault here for not getting to the roll-in on sects and cults. so, but you're right, you're exactly right about the power of media and the history of
conce allows weaving to be performed from either side using multiple groups of yarn twisted together and passed over varying numbers of warps through the months of april and may, meter by meter the forms of the tapestry gradually begito emerge. miro has said of his approach to art, "things come to me slowly. my vocabulary formsas not been the discovery of a day. it took shape alst in spite of myself. in this way, ty ripen in my spirit." into the steamy month of august, the spirit of "femme" grows until the figure is complete. now, with only a few inches of background remaining, royo welcomes miro to his studio once more to witness the final steps of an eight-month process. royo says, "working together, we have become solosely attuned that i can almost read his mind. i take direction as much from an expression or gesture as from words or sketches. working with miro has forced me make a constant effort to do better, an effort from which i have benefited in many respects." for these two catalan artists, it has been a fulfilling experience. what was born in the imagination of one artist
of members of public come in front of us, looking for reasons why all of these projects were overbudget and i think there is a lot of waste there government. we just talked about the hetch hetchy matter and building was supposed to be $140 million, but it was actually $65 million over budget. the department of public works doesn't even have all of its receipts. the bond oversight committee is supposed to be have access to those receipts. they can't get them. so we ce[6ud money is not accounted for. we found waste in the arts commission, which the controllers office confirmed and the civil grand jury confirm and we also found waste in various other departments. and this board of supervisors needs people on it who will actually ask those questions. thank you. we have a couple other candidates who wanted to jump in here. mr. davis and miss selby. >> after $1.5 billion in public service sector cuts in san francisco since 2008, since our budget crisis, we can't balance our budget going forward on cuts alone. we have got to look for revenue with muni failing and unmaintained parks we need a comp
continues to shrink. i think now what used to be a one-pound can of tomatoes is about 13 and a quarter ounces. now, you just run into that all the time- the idea that more and more stores like walgreens and some of these big ones, they only want to stock the items that have a very short shelf life. so if you happen to be in the habit of using something that's maybe not the fastest-mover of a maybe a medium mover, or heaven forbid, a slow mover, you know, you can't get it anymore. and i think when you live with this kind of- a mind set that no one's really thinking of you- we're not customers anymore who are always right; we're consumers, whose mission, in the eyes of the television commercial, is to buy, buy, buy, consume, consume, consume. yeah, we're not vacuum cleaners for what they produce. >> but what's your point? i mean, that's capitalism. i mean, we're not talking about an ethical issue here unless you're talking about- the difference between a spiritual approach to commerce versus a greedy approach to commerce, for want of another word. >> okay. greedy's bad, in my view. >> ah
things you never knew existed. it's a rare film for really allowing us to see the pressures and the constraints and the demands on masculinity on men for an ideal of masculinity. i think in lang's kind of worldview, what he sees is that that little guy is going to lose, you know, that the cynics of the world are going to be able to prey on people who are believers. "scarlet street" could be considered film noir for a number of reasons. first of all, you have a kind of illusion of bourgeois or petty bourgeois order which the bank clerk represents, and that is disrupted. he's cast out from his normal existence into a dangerous, glamorous street world. that sequence when chris cross first sees kitty is close to being the essence of noir. it stopped raining. yeah, a half-hour ago. oh, which way is it to the east side subway? 'round the corner, past the el, 4 blocks. oh, thank you, officer. i guess i got turned around. these streets are all mixed up in greenwich village. (hoberman) appearances are deceptive. space is deformed by the lighting patterns. it's the city late at night.
cheering ) hall: the incandescence that we saw on the 11th of october led us to believe that an eruption could come very soon. buenos días, cómo montecito... narrator mothes hall need a closer look at the smokg crater. here, theyonfront the odds of disaster. hall: given that yes, now we have magma in the crater, all the way to the summit of the mountain, all we need is some big explosions to get that lava out and down the flanks of the volcano. narrator: but rather than send out a red alert, the scientists still show restraint. so they are surprised in october when the president of ecuador comes to baños and overreacts to their less acute orange alert. hall: he decided right then that we need an evacuation, we need it now. narrator: the military forces 25,000 tourists and residts to evacuatall areas surrounding tuua. ( sire wli ) en lo doña inés; yo me voy ahora. ( man king annouement over loudspeaker ) even more disruptive: ey have 36 hours to leave. mothes: the institute had recommended that this evacuation could take place over a period of days, not in a day and a half, because
of the ivory coast-- who we allowed to settle, who are planters and who live here side by side with us. narrator: various ethnic groups migrated from the poorer northern savannas. many were baules, originally from the center of the country, but also the senufos, malinkes and lobis from the north. the plantations also attracted workers from other countries, including migrants from the semi-desert called sahel in mali and burkina faso. the presence of... of foreigners in côte d'ivoire is important. it's been estimated that they comprise 40% of the population. narrator: together with unemployed ivorians, many foreigners ended up in shantytowns, like this one near abidjan, called washington. ( man speaking french ) translator: first of all, it was foreigners, the burkinabes and the malians who were even more numerous. then, in the '80s, with the crisis, e population of this area swelled with people om all over e ivory cot itself. at the moment, e are peopleoming om all over from all over the ivory coast. you can find baules, agnis, dyulas and maukas from the north. narrator: but the north
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)